Monday, 20 March 2017

Changes at The People's Friend

The People's Friend staff will soon be moving offices. For now, continue to send submissions to 80 Kingsway East, Dundee 8SL.

The editor, Shirley Blair, mentions on her blog that writers may have to wait a little longer than usual to get replies and asks that they 'bear with us' for a time.

Friday, 17 March 2017

Every Day Fiction

Every Day Fiction is a paying fiction market. Don't get too excited – it's only a token payment of $3.

Regularly published writers have probably lost interest by now. Those who're newer to submitting might feel that having someone so keen to publish your story they're willing to pay, is worth more than the sum involved.

For those who are still with me, stories may be any length, up to 1,000 words and of any genre. If you have a piece which you'd love to see published, but which doesn't fit into the womag market, this could be a good place to try it. There's also a reasonable chance you'll get useful feedback on your work and, if published, there's an opportunity to promote your blog or even books. Either of those could be valuable.


Sunday, 12 March 2017

Two years!

It's now two years since I took over the Womagwriter blog.

If I'd realised in time there would have been cake, but someone ate it. Here are some flowers instead. They're biennial wallflowers, which sort of makes them sound appropriate if you don't think about it for too long.

Under the circumstances, I hope you'll forgive a plug for this rather excellent guide to writing fiction. It's not just me saying it's good - there are a baker's dozen 5 star reviews.

Shouldn't have mention baking and the lack of cake. I'll be in the kitchen if anyone wants me.

Wednesday, 8 March 2017

Guest post by womagwriter Maggie Cobbett

Today's guest is Maggie Cobbet.

Thank you very much for inviting me to guest on your blog, Patsy. ‘Fillers’ have long been a supplementary form of writing income for me and are a particular comfort whenever a painstakingly crafted story is rejected. I’ve given talks, written articles, run workshops and even been persuaded to publish a handbook on the subject. (Sales of Easy Money For Writers and Wannabes have far outstripped those of my other books, so I must have got something right!) 

Womag devotees will already know of the ‘filler’ opportunities offered by the women’s magazine market but may not have looked much further afield. There are publications out there linked to just about every human activity and a great many editors welcome snippets to complete their pages. One of the first successes that I chalked up was a reader’s letter to a DIY magazine popular with my father, but over the years I have also contributed to titles dedicated to antiques and collectables, cookery, current affairs, family history, film & television, gardening, health, lifestyle, music, pets, regional interest, satire, sports, travel and even writing. Magazines and editors come and go, but keep an eye on your newsagent’s shelves and you’ll be amazed at what you find. 
 
For now, I’d like to focus on Reader’s Digest. You’ll probably all be familiar with out of date copies gathering dust in your doctor’s or dentist’s waiting room. Pick up a current one the next time you’re out shopping and take a good look at page 4. On offer in the February 2017 issue are:

£50 for the star letter and £30 for regular letters; 
£50 for the true stories, anecdotes, jokes in Laugh! and You Couldn’t Make It Up...; contributions to end-of-article fillers and My Great Escape (travel column).

I’ve had repeated success in all these areas, so why not you? Good luck, everyone!

Saturday, 4 March 2017

Guest post by editor Rosemary J Kind

Today's guest is writer and editor, Rosemary J Kind

At the heart of setting up Alfie Dog Fiction was a recognition that so many good womag stories aren’t published, or are published once and then find no more readers. Alfie Dog Fiction set out to provide an additional or alternative home for short stories. We wanted somewhere that would carry the best of all fiction, regardless of whether it had been published before and which generated royalties for the authors.

Over the five years since we began we’ve grown to become one of the biggest paid short story download sites in the world and been delighted to have stories we’ve nominated accepted for the Write Well Awards on both of the last two years.

We now have two submission windows a year and the next one opens for four weeks from the 5th March. We are looking for good quality stories. Stories that will leave the reader satisfied at the end. Whether it is romance or horror, general fiction or crime we do want a good story line. Our full submission criteria are on the site.

What aren’t we looking for is often more useful. Avoid clich├ęd storylines or characters. If I can guess your twist ending while still on page one then it isn’t that much of a twist. If you can surprise me with a twist ending that is consistent with the story then you will certainly have me hooked. If you can move me to tears or make me laugh out loud then you’re in with a pretty good chance too. Although I have read quite literally thousands of short stories in recent years, I’m still a reader at heart. I love a good story.

If you haven’t sent off short stories before then there is lots of good advice in the book that Patsy and I wrote together. From Story Idea to Reader was born out of the experiences we have between us of writing and publishing.

Depending on the volumes of submissions I will try to give some feedback if I can, particularly if a writer shows promise. If you want more detailed feedback we do offer a paid critique service for work you want to place elsewhere. The other thing worth doing before you submit is to download some of the stories we have on the site to get a feel for them. We do offer a few for free and many hundreds on a paid download basis, including many of Patsy’s.

Thursday, 2 March 2017

Guest post by aspiring womag writer Julie Day

Today's guest is Julie Day.

Why I write womag stories

I've been writing (or trying to write) short stories for women's magazines for about five years now, but it's only been the last couple of years that I have taken it seriously; submitting and reading the magazines. I've been to a few Woman's Weekly workshops and met the Fiction Editor, and it's these that have made me really want to get a story in Woman's Weekly.

Within the last year, I have found a Facebook group for womag writes, who have been very supportive. It also helps to know that I'm not the only one submitting and being rejected. Through this group I have found a blog to put my stories on for feedback, and the advice I have got there, especially from experienced writers, has been helpful and I've learnt a lot. I feel that my writing has improved because of it. I am continuing to use this blog to help me improve more.

Even though the market for womag stories has shrunk even more, I am not giving up. I am more determined to carry on. I will keep on reading the magazines, and finding new markets to write for, even outside the UK.

I have had short stories published in small press magazines over the years but not a national one. So, to see a story in a womag with my name next to it will give me such a buzz, knowing that I am starting to get there with my story writing.

So, if you want to write for womags, here are some tips:

1. Don't give up
2. Read the magazines and study them.
3. Read their guidelines
4. Keep an eye out for new markets
5. Find a group on or off-line for feedback
6. Take their advice, esp from published womag writers
7. Don't give up
8. Join an online group for support. You won't feel you are the only one.