Tuesday, 14 June 2016

Changes at Fiction Feast

I've just had a couple of stories accepted by Norah at Take a Break's Fiction Feast (Yay!)

Along with that news, she informed me there are now new payment rates. You've guessed it - they haven't gone up! One page stories will still recieve the same amount, but the extra for longer ones is no longer so generous. Can't say I'm pleased at the changes, but I do understand why they're doing this and personally I'd rather get a bit less per sale than sell fewer stories.

If you've had stories accepted prior to today, then these will still be paid for at the old rates.

20 comments:

Shane Telford said...

I suppose it's a small price to pay (or not be paid) for the opportunities give us! Congratulations by the way! I sent a few stories off in April so I'm crossing my fingers for my first TAB sale and this news has got me waiting by the letterbox and refreshing my emails.

Anonymous said...

Fiction Feast should consider a differential payment system in the same way that other magazines have whereby writers start off on the same rate but earn more as they sell more. It's bad practice to put payment down like this across the board. Very poor for morale and badly done!

Sue Blackburn said...

Congratulations on your sales Patsy. I'm still trying to crack TAB FF code!! Just read your lovely story in FF out now and really enjoyed it x

Anonymous said...

Well done Patsy, and have to say I agree about the differential payment system. If it's good enough for WW! Must admit as someone who makes my living from writing I struggle with the 'it's a small price to pay' attitude. Today I received a pretty hefty pay cut. I doubt the editor at TAB did.

Anonymous said...

Well done Patsy on your success. I seem to see your name everywhere in the woman's magazines, which is well deserved. Anyway, I must admit I'm not a regular contributor to TAB. However, had TAB said something like, 'Sorry ladies and gentlemen but we have to reduce the amount we pay for your stories because of x, y or z,' then I could understand. If they haven't given a reason then that's pretty naughty. Doesn't seem fair to me. Just saying...

Anonymous said...

Just out of interest (and not that I'm thinking about my own submissions or anything) but could somebody please tell me how TAB FF inform you that they have accepted your story: do they send a letter, email or phone? Cheers!

Patsy said...

@ Shane, Sue, and the others who offered them - thanks for the congratulations.

Re the different price levels and just to play devil's advocate* - is a story worth more just because the author has had a little more success?

*Not that I'm suggesting whoever controls magazine finance is actually a devil.

Anonymous 3 - they did say something along those lines, saying they knew authors would be disappointed and that they felt this move was needed to help ensure the future of the magazine.

Anonymous 4 - usual way is an email, but sometimes it's a phone call. Either way, you'd then be asked to format the story to their requirements (if it doesn't already match) and email it in. Payment is very soon after publication.

Shane Telford said...

I've always wondered why they insist on an SAE to send us our rejections, especially now I know they reply via email/phone. Surely it'd save both sides a bit of effort if they didn't!

Patsy said...

It's only acceptances which come via email, Shane. Rejections are posted.

Shane Telford said...

I must be due a few of those - although I think they might be suffering a bit of a back log. I've yet to hear about three stories sent back at the start of April... but I'm pretending that's a good sign!

Anonymous said...

"is a story worth more just because the author has had a little more success?"

I think that misses the point. Tell me any other industry where someone who goes in at entry level makes the same money as someone who has been working for the company for 20 years.

Anonymous said...

I worry about this one a little. If WW have two stories and one is by a new author they pay 150 and one is by a veteran who they pay a lot more, if they want to keep their costs down (or on budget even) who's story are they going to pick?

Shane Telford said...

We could also argue that, a good story is a good story, whether written by a novice or someone established in the business - and that, if all was fair in the world, writers should be paid the same amount of money for the same amount of work.

Anonymous said...

Shane, then you should write to People's Friend, My Weekly and Woman's Weekly and make your case, because they have always worked on the same system that most businesses do, which is that you start on the lowest pay rate and get an increment the longer you work there and the more experience you get.

I think such magazines probably appreciate that though it may be relatively easy for someone to write one good story a year, to be able to consistently turn out stories that appeal to their market over a number of years is a skill worth rewarding in a small pay rise every now and then.

Anonymous above - I think if a magazine editor likes two stories, one by a writer who sells a lot to them and one by a new writer, then they will choose both. They have to fill those pages week on week, month on month and year on year, remember.

sharon said...

I wonder if this fall in payment from TABFF will put some writers off from subbing to them now. Or is the competition going to become even more fiercer?
If writers need the TABFF story fees, surely they need to work harder now to guarantee a living wage?
For a large portion of semi- pro writers (like me) story sales are a bonus and a boost. We don't rely on the income from it. It's still a bit of blow though, no matter what your status and level of writing experience.

Anonymous said...

Take a Break are probably one of the better payers, but as long as short story writers are prepared to accept very low payments, smile sweetly and be grovellingly grateful for them, editors will continue to get away with ripping off writers.

Fay Knowles said...

Congratulations, Patsy! Unfortunately, British magazines aren't available in The Bahamas where I live, but I did download your excellent book of short stories "Not a Drop to Drink" and thoroughly enjoyed it.

Patsy said...

@ Sharon - I expect competition will stay as fierce as ever.

@ Anonymous (last one above) - I've not yet had an editor expect me to grovel. Of course I'd like the magazines to offer higher rates, and for there to be more of them doing it, but I don't think it's fair to say we're being ripped off by the editors. For one thing, financial decisions are unlikely to be made by them and for another, we chose who we submit to. If we feel we're being cheated, we can stop writing for that publication.

@ Fay - It is possible to read many of the British mags electronically. I'll try to do a post on that.

So pleased you liked my collection. If it was you who left the most recent review thank you for that - reviews are always appreciated and such glowing ones especially so!

Fay Knowles said...

Thanks, Patsy. Unfortunately, subscribing to magazines even digitally can prove quite costly. So good to live in the UK where you can just pick magazines up from newsstands at your leisure. I just checked out the review I left for "Not a Drop to Drink". Glad you liked it, but I should have said more! The stories are really good. You are so right about reviews. I encourage everyone to take the time to leave a review, no matter how short, after you've read a book. This means so much to the author, who has worked hard at writing the book, and also helps prospective buyers.

Teresa Ashby said...

Congratulations on the sales, Patsy. I've got mixed feelings on the differential pay system. I can see both sides of that argument. News of the pay cut was a blow for sure.